Monarch Watch Blog

Archive for the ‘Monarch Biology’ Category

Monarch population crash in 2013

11 June 2021 | Author: Chip Taylor

What contributed to the monarch population crash in 2013? The text below was written at the time the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was evaluating evidence of all aspects of the monarch population prior to determining whether the monarch should be ...

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Monarchs and the freeze in Texas

1 June 2021 | Author: Chip Taylor

by Chip Taylor, Director, Monarch Watch; Carol Clark, Monarch Watch Conservation Specialist; and Janis Lentz, Volunteer The following is a long report about the impact of the freeze in February 2021 on the development of this year's monarch population. If ...

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Nectar plants used by monarchs during March in Texas

25 May 2021 | Author: Chip Taylor

by Chip Taylor, Director of Monarch Watch and Carol Clark, Monarch Conservation Specialist Introduction Extreme weather events can have short and long-term impacts on the flora and fauna of a region and can even have an impact on migratory species such as ...

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Monarch coloration, milkweed toxins, and predation by birds

5 November 2020 | Author: Chip Taylor

This text is both a preamble and addendum to the "Monarch Fallout and A Predator Story" blog article posted recently by Brad Guhr of the Dyck Arboretum (republished below, with permission). PREAMBLE Predation by birds has been offered as the explanation for ...

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Why monarchs are an enzyme – Part 3

6 March 2020 | Author: Chip Taylor

Why monarchs are an enzyme - Part 1 Why monarchs are an enzyme - Part 2 In Part 2 of this tutorial on monarch demography, I dealt with realized fecundity and age to first reproduction with the promise that the next topic ...

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Why monarchs are an enzyme – Part 2

25 February 2020 | Author: Chip Taylor

See Why monarchs are an enzyme - Part 1 posted earlier this month. What the heck is realized fecundity/fertility and why is it important? A term I mention from time to time in my talks is realized fecundity. Add to that, I ...

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Why monarchs are an enzyme – Part 1

10 February 2020 | Author: Chip Taylor

Monarchs are an enzyme or rather a complex set of enzymes that interact with the physical environment in a deterministic manner. In this article, I’m going to argue that the responses of monarchs to physical conditions are determined by their ...

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2018 Monarch Calendar Project

10 March 2018 | Author: Jim

NOTE: We will send an email with a link to the actual submission form after each period comes to a close (June 20th for period 1 and September 25th for period 2). Please hang onto any data sheets you have ...

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New Monarch Watch Citizen Scientist Project

31 March 2017 | Author: Jim

Monarch Watch is seeking the immediate assistance of hundreds of monarch enthusiasts (citizen scientists) in collecting observations of monarchs in their area during the spring and fall. This project is an attempt to assemble quantitative data on monarch numbers at ...

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Monarch Caterpillar Dorsal Aorta (video)

29 March 2011 | Author: Chip Taylor

serendipity [ser-uhn-dip-i-tee] -noun. 1. an aptitude for making unexpected and fortunate discoveries Occasionally, there is a little serendipity in the lab. One Friday, a few weeks ago, I noticed an unusual larva, a fourth instar of a "black" larval mutation we are ...

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